People

Faculty

Mark Greif

Mark Greif

Co-director, Stanford Public Humanities

Mark Greif is an Associate Professor of English at Stanford. He is a founder of the magazine n+1, and has published in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Harper’s, Guardian (UK), National Post (Canada), Le Monde, Süddeutsche Zeitung, and other periodicals internationally. His essays have been chosen for Best American Essays and translated and anthologized, and his book Against Everything was a finalist for the National Book Critics’ Circle Award in Criticism.

Fred Turner in his office surrounded by books

Fred Turner

Co-director CHE Grants

Fred Turner is the Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication and Akiko Yamizake and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education at Stanford University. He is the author of five books: Seeing Silicon Valley: Life inside a Fraying America (with Mary Beth Meehan); L’Usage de L’Art dans la Silicon Valley;  The Democratic Surround: Multimedia and American Liberalism from World War II to the Psychedelic Sixties;  From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism; and Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American Memory. Before coming to Stanford, he worked for ten years as a journalist. He has written for newspapers and magazines ranging from the Boston Globe Sunday Magazine to Harper’s.

Blakey Vermeule

Blakey Vermuele

Co-director, Stanford Public Humanities

Blakey Vermeule is the Albert Guérard Professor of Literature at Stanford and the Chair of the English Department. She is the author of three books, one on eighteenth-century moral psychology and literature, one on the theory of literary characters, and one on the ancient debate between the active life and the contemplative life (co-authored with Jennifer Summit). Her current project is about the post-Freudian conception of the unconscious mind.

Staff

Laura Goode

Laura Goode

Associate Director for Student Programs, Stanford Public Humanities

Laura Goode is a Lecturer in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Stanford. She is the author of two books, the poetry collection Become a Name (2016) and the young adult novel Sister Mischief (2011); she co-wrote and produced the feature film Farah Goes Bang, which premiered at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival and won the Nora Ephron Prize from Tribeca and Vogue. Her popular nonfiction has received support from the Steinbeck Fellowship and the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, and appeared in publications including New Republic, Publishers Weekly, BuzzFeed Reader, The Cut, Catapult, Refinery29, ELLE, Glamour, and Longreads. She received a BA in English and Comparative Literature and an MFA in Writing from Columbia University.

Natalie Jabbar

Natalie Jabbar

Associate Director, Stanford Public Humanities

Natalie Jabbar has been a member of the communications team for Stanford's School of Humanities and Sciences since 2010. With a background in journalistic writing and extensive higher education experience, she supports faculty as they make connections between their work and the public sphere. Over the years, she has collaborated with individuals across the university and beyond to help promote research and to raise the visibility of the value of studying the liberal arts. Her storytelling skills have been applied to both university projects and freelance writing endeavors ranging from features profiles to health articles. She received her BA in English and her MA in Journalism from Stanford. 

Jeff Schwegman

Jeff Schwegman

Assistant Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences

Jeff Schwegman provides overall staff leadership for the Changing Human Experience. He also oversees a broad range of initiatives for the School of Humanities and Sciences to support undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty in the humanities, arts, and social sciences. Previously, he taught freshmen in Stanford’s Thinking Matters and IHUM programs and served as an instructional consultant for the Center for Teaching and Learning. He also held a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Max Plank Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. Jeff has a PhD in history from Princeton University and a BA in history from Stanford. Outside work, he enjoys hiking, wildlife photography, and composing classical music, and he volunteers as a docent at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve.